Glitter Powder Size Chart

Glitter Powder Size Chart

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Inches Inches mm Microns 1/500" .002" 0.05mm 50microns 1/350" .003" 0.07mm 75microns 1/256" .004" 0.1mm 100microns 1/128" .008" 0.2mm 200microns 1/96" .010" 0.3mm 250microns 1/64" .015" 0.4mm 375microns 1/40" .025" 0.6mm 625microns 1/32" .031" 0.8mm 775microns 1/24" .040" 1mm 1000microns 1/20" .050" 1.3mm 1250microns 1/16" .0625" 1.6mm 1550microns 1/12" .084" 2mm 2100microns 1/10" .094" 2.5mm 2385microns 1/8" .125" 3mm 3125microns 1/4" . 25" 6mm 6250microns
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Identify The Quality of Glitter Powder

Identify The Quality of Glitter Powder

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To identify the quality of glitter powder mainly from its Appearance (including Brightness, Shape), Temperature Resistance, Solvent Resistance. 1. Appearance: The high quality glitter powder is brightness, regular shape, uniform size, clean-cut, and without impurity etc. 2. Temperature Resistance: Heating the glitter powder to high temperature, to check if it is getting fade. 3. Solvent Resistance: Dip the glitter powder into the solvent, to check if it is getting fade.
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Glitter Arts and Crafts

Glitter Arts and Crafts

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Glitter is very popularly used in arts and crafts. These shiny things are basically made by one or a combination of these materials: plastic, glass, paper, and minerals. They are colorful and comes in different shapes and sizes. Glitter can be used to make anything sparkle, such as holiday candle holders, bangles or bracelets, a pendant, a centerpiece for Thanksgiving or any other occasion, or a Christmas ornament, and also be used  to decorate clothing.  
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Glitter and Its History

Glitter and Its History

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Glitter describes an assortment of small, flat, reflective particles. Glitter particles reflect light at different angles, causing the surface to sparkle or shimmer. Glitter is like confetti, sparkles, or sequins, but somewhat smaller. Since prehistoric times, glitter has been made and used as decoration, from many different materials including stones such as malachite, galena, and mica,as well as insects and glass. The modern word “glitter” comes from glitra in Old Norse through Middle English. However, as early as 30,000 years ago, mica flakes were used to give cave paintings a glittering appearance. Prehistoric humans are believed to have used cosmetics, made of powdered hematite, a sparkling mineral. Over 6,000 years ago, ancient Egyptians produced glittering cosmetics from the iridescent shells of beetles as well as finely ground green malachite crystal. Researchers believe Mayan temples were sometimes painted with red, green,…
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